About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
KRCB (PBS) 25
LANGUAGE
English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
the connecticut massacre still raw, spencer michels looks at a california law that aims to head off such violence. >> reporter: though no one knows the diagnosis of the perpetrator of the shootings in newtown, the killings have raised once again the issue of forcing the mentally ill into treatment. >> warner: as congress comes back to washington to resume fiscal cliff negotiations, we ask, what happens if they don't reach a deal? >> ifill: we talk with a representative of egypt's muslim brotherhood about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the goinsupport othese institutio and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation
last week in connecticut. but gun advocates are pitching new state laws that allow teachers to carry concealed weapons to school, and one state, virginia, is considering a bill to require teachers to carry weapons to work. president obama promised to make gun control a central issue for his next term. vice president joe biden is leading the administration effort to limit gun violence. early next month biden will deliver a set of specific legislative proposals for dollars tightening gun laws. so, conesswoman norton are guns in schools the answer? >> oh, bonnie. our country is in for another failing grade on guns if our best answer is guns in the schools. our best answer is to new town. >> i own guns. i'm generally skeptical of gun control but i'm not sure i'm ready to turn all american schools in to armed camps. >> absolutely not. in china the same day as newtown shooting there was man with a knife that entered a school. nobody was killed. this seems to imply the opsite. that gun outf school is actual answer. >> i think guns in the hands of the right people or right person could be pa
: connecticut independent senator joe leiberman observed on cnn that passing new gun laws won't be easy. >> the strength of the nra that more than half of the abuts in america have guns, own guns, have them in their homes. >> brown: they already may be having affect, gun store owners around the country have reported their stock is flying off the shelves. >> we have christmas business, hunting season business now we have the political business. >> brown: back in newtown the focus remained on coping with a christmas ravaged by grief. local post office received a flood of cards with messages of hope and towns people expect to light hundreds of outdoor candles tonight for the 26 shooting victims. >> ifill: still to come on the newshour, egypt's troubled referendum; medical marijuana runs into federal law; special elections coming to the senate; helping haiti's orphans; and hundred years of "poetry" magazine. but first, with the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the christmas of 2012 began arriving around the world this evening. in bethlehem, manger square was adorned
. >> i think all that is true. i do think the change in the commitment laws over the last 30 or 40 years has made it very difficult to compel someone to get treatment or be detained in a mental institution. these killers, is not as if there is a lack of funds for treatment. it is the lack of the ability of a parent would obviously have been a child, to go through the legal loopholes, is such that it is almost impossible. you end up with the tucson shooter who everyone spoke about. they had a sense he was psychotic. on guns, the problem is this. unless you are willing to completely disarm the population, as you do in canada or britain or australia did in th 19's, and that works and you have a decrease in gun crimes, if you allow grandfather of existing weapons, as would happen with the 1994 assault weapons law, at which time there were 25 million of the high- capacity magazines already in circulation, you do not accomplish anything. the studies of the 10-year experiment with the ban on assault weapons in the 1990's up to 2004 shows it had no effect. >> iapril968, was in ebenezer baptist
. it meant conforming to strict jewish laws. >> ( dramatized ): this is the law, to make a distinction between the unclean and the clean, and between the living creature that may be eaten, and the living creature that may not be eaten. >> there are several issues involved here. one is the notion of the dietary laws, the eating restrictions that would have obtained for eang ctain kinds of food if one was an observant jew; also with whom one could eat. >> narrator: in paul's view, it was now possible to allow gentiles who didn't observe all the jewish food laws to participate in the communal meals of the movement. >> but because it's at a meal, it also runs headlong into some jewish sensitivities about what kind of foods you can eat and with whom you can eat. >> narrator: dietary laws were not the only regulations that marked jewish identity. >> ( dramatized ): every male among you shall be circumcised, and it shall be a sign of the covenant between me and you. >> of course, the major issues in converting to judaism for a gentile, for a non-jew, is that one must, if a male, become circum
.re >> ifill: plus, 2013 will be am pivotal year for the new health care reform law. ray suarez gets an update from julie rovner of npr. from the island of mindanao in the philippines, fred de sam lazaro profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to liv
, enforce the laws. yes, i know. determined killers will always find a way, but we can minimize the opportunities and scale back the scope of destruction. why do we accept the need for driver's licenses or submit to the sometimes humiliating body scans at airports? because it's the law, and deep down we know we're safer for the inconvenience of the law. good laws are hard to come by. civilization, just as hard. the rough and tumble of politics makes them so. but democracy aims for a moral order as just as humanly possible, which means laws that protect the weak and not just the strong. lest we forget. >>> we've seen throughout our history what happens when politics doesn't work, when democracy breaks down. the greatest, most heartbreaking problem was the failure toll solve slavery, a failure that l led to civil war. even then, it took a last act of political courage and prowess to permanently abolish slavery with the 13th amendment to the constitution. this is the story told in the beautiful motion picture "lincoln" starring daniel day lewis and sally field. the film presents th
to have to mobilize. a lot will depend on the consciences of people who opposed the laws and have a change of heart. >> and kevin, six week ago, approximately, we had an election. >> you noticed that. >> what did you see? what patterns did you see? what lessons can you take from what the voting was? >> i think there are several things. one is the there is a big cautionary tale in this election for republicans and for conservative religious groups who want to put an emphasis on the hot button social issues. gay marriage, abortion, and this year, rape, surprisingly. that's not going to be enough to win anymore. and they can't just rely on the traditional white evangelical base to win anymore. they need to broadenhetent. if they push too hard on some of these conservative, really conservative social issues, it will end up alienating and i think we saw that in a lot of the senate races. so i think the key takeaway from this year's election was that it would be broader. what that means for religious people, it will need to be a broader set of issues that they get involved in. >> one of my favor
on the white house web site calling for new gun laws. underscoring that plea, a gunman killed three people today west of harrisburg, pennsylvania. he was killed later in a shootout with state troopers. since the attack, the nra has been the subject of heavy criticism, but its leaders had refused to do any interviews before this weekend, including the newshour. the group broke its near silence in washington, d.c., this morning. vice president wayne lapierre would not answer any questions, but reaa nearly 25-minute- long statement that called for armed guards in every school. here are excerpts of what he said. he was interrupted twice by protesters. >> the national rifle association's four million mothers, fathers, sons and daughters join the nation in horror, outrage, grief and earnest prayer for the families of wtown, connecticut, who have suffered such incomprehensible loss as a result of this unspeakable crime. for all the noise and anger directed at us over the past week, no one-- nobody-- has addressed the most important, pressing and immediate question we face: how do we protect our
about revising the law to set target of 2%. >> we think the yen we think it's supporting for weaker yen. european debt concern should be eased things to esm. >> let's get a check on how tokyo stocks are reacting. it's currently at 10,094. a gain of 1.6% from friday's close. many analysts think the trend will continue. in other business headlines the rate of unpaid tensipensions inn hit a record high. around 26% or more than 4.5 million of those enrolled failed to pay premiums between april 2009 and march 2011. 74% said they couldn't pay because the premium is too high. 10% refuse to pay because they couldn't trust the system. the monthly premium is about $180. despite the increasing popularity of smart phones, japanese makers are expected to face another tough year. worldwide production of mobile phones will rise 12% next year to $245 billion. that's as increasing number of people switch to smartphones from regular phones. shair share their share is expected to decli decline. apple and south korea's samsung remain strong. time to get a check global enoc calendar for this week. it's a sl
's rape laws and efforts to expedite trials. meanwhile, police moved to quell a rally by about 500 students protesting the treatment of women as they moved toward a monument in new delhi. the students complained officials had declared the site off limits. >> ( translated ): we are taking out this peaceful protest. we don't have any conflict with the police. we have just come here to express our stand. all the students are expressing their opinions here as you can see so the police should allow all of us to pass through to the place. this is only our demand and nothing else. >> holman: the rape that ignited the protests was that of a 23- year-old woman attacked by six men, then thrown from a moving bus. overnight, she arrived in singapore via air ambulance for treatment of severe internal injuries. doctors described her condition as extremely critical. the top prosecutor in egypt has ordered an investigation of major opposition leaders for allegedly inciting revolt. an official in the prosecutor's office said today the probe will focus on nobel peace laureate mohammed el-baradei, f
insurance program, or chip, which under current law are exempt from the sequester, could be one area where lawmakers look to make cuts. in 2010, more than 40%-- or about $278 billion states received in overall funding-- went to these two programs. >> looking at past proposals, there is a good chance that something like medicaid would be cut, and that would obviously have direct impact on state budgets. but what it would entail is still unknown. >> reporter: also on the table for lawmakers to consider: municipal bonds. they've traditionally been tax- exempt. if that changes, they could become less attractive as an investment vehicle, and end up raising borrowing costs for states and municipalities. >> it would effectively increase the cost of issuing debt to state and local governments, and it's a real consideration at a time when states and local governments are still in repair mode. >> reporter: while some states have built up rainy day funds, credit rating analysts at s&p say for the first time since the start of the financial crisis, the health of the overall u.s. economy has become the
point in negotiations: a decades old law, called the container royalty fund. it was established in the 1960s to help dockworkers displaced by technology, the port alliance says these days those royalties serve as a bonus to workers, not a safety net. but the union disagrees saying the payments still help compensate workers for lost job opportunities. florida is home to almost a third of the ports that would be affected by the potential strike, governor rick scott says he's still thinks a deal will be reached, but if it doesn't he's counting on washington to step in. allison worrell, "n.b.r.," fort lauderdale, florida. >> susie: volatility was the word of the day here on wall street. investors were fixated on the war of words in washington over the fiscal cliff, and shrugged off some encouraging news today about jobs. fewer americans filed for jobless benefits last week: new claims fell 12,000 to 350,000. but the labor department says the christmas holiday may have distorted the numbers, as some state offices were closed monday and tuesday and could not provide data. in the marke
president vladimir putin signed a bill into law today banning americans from adopting russian children. the move terminated more than 50 adoptions that already were underway. the measure came in reaction to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russians accused of human rights abuses. former president george h.w. bush was said to be alert and improving today. family sposman sd he's en sging with doctors and nurses. mr. bush is 88 years old. he's been hospitalized in houston with complications from bronchitis. this week, he was placed in intensive care, but in an e-mail yesterday, his chief of staff said the former president wants people to put the harps back in the closet. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to margaret. >> warner: the victim of a horrific gang rape in india died tonight at a hospital in singapore. the attack enraged much of the country, and the reaction caught the government off-guard. ray suarez has more. >> suarez: the fury across india has been building for nearly two weeks, since a 23-year-old medical student was gang-raped and then thrown from this bus
of the way. chinese law states drivers must give way to emergency vehicles on duty, but it took 40 minutes to get the patient to hospital just three kilometers away. she didn't make it. a doctor in the ambulance wrote in her blog that the situation was deplorable. many responded. one person said people can save lives by giving way to ambulances. another expressed disappointment in people's coldness. an expert says now is the time to change drivers' behavior. >> change the traffic regulation and more education to change the behavior of a driver by a combination of countermeasures together to change the situation. >> reporter: with so many cars on the road, campaigns to increase safety are bound to land. but gradually safety-conscious people are making inroads. takafumi terui, nhk world, beijing. >>> iran will conduct naval drills for six days in the strait of hormuz in the persian gulf. the exercise is apparently meant to showcase its military strength in the world's vital oil and gas shipping route. iran's naval commander told reporters the drills will begin on friday. they'll involve area
in health insurance or employment based on genetic information. it is a much-needed law. as the development of sequencing technology has exceeded the imagination of even the most optimistic scientists. >> if you look at the history of the internet of the personal computers or the history of telecommunication or the history of transport, no one at the beginning predicted what the impact of the technology would be. what the world would look like with the technologies fully integrated and how fast the transition would be once things really took off. so we believe that dna and the knowledge of dna sequence is just entering that transformative moment. >> now we meet the beery family as they share their story of heartbreak and hope. today, twins alexis and noah beery are typical energetic and athletic 13-year-olds but their lives have not always been this way. the 8th grader recall a day when the most basic activity was a struggle. >> before we would wobble, and we wouldn't be able to talk. we would just we couldn't do anything. we couldn't learn. >> i'd see other kids doing all is stuff doing sp
not think i have come to abolish the law or the prophets. i have come not to abolish but to fulfill." >> what we learned from the gospel stories is not that jesus was not jewish. quite the opposite. he's completely embedded in the judaism of his time. >> was jesus a jew? of course jesus was a jew. he was born of a jewish mother in galilee, a jewish part of the world. all of his friends, associates, colleagues, disciples-- all of them were jews. he regularly worshipped in jewish communal worship-- what we call synagogues. he preached from jewish text, from the bible. he celebrated jewish festivals. he was born, lived, died, taught as a jew. nowadays, there are temples and sygogues everyere you go there is not a jewish community in the world that doesn't have a synagogue, and many of them are called temples. in this period, however, we should always remember that there is only one temple, and that's the one temple in jerusalem. ( people conversing in background ) >> narrator: for jews living in the time of jesus, the temple in jerusalem was the center of their religious life. >> the j
about international copyright law. he felt that writers were being cheated himself among them of their due earnings because copyright editors side with publishers. there was no international copyright law ever in america. his books were endlessly reprinted without him getting a penny. this was regarded... his statement on this was regarded as outrageous but the american press who denounced him instantly and said if that's all you've got to say go home. we don't want to know. we don't want you coming here and lecturing us on this. they believed that you could download anything from the internet free. the man had written a book and it was in the public domain. >> freedom is very interesting there because in some sense what he hated about america, what the people made too free with him this was the great land of opportunity, the great land of freedom. the grate democratic experiment. yet people were perhaps a little too familiar with hip. them didn't... he didn't like the fact that they treated him as an equal. that's very strange but on the other hand it's typical of dickens. he
. this was 1999 and i was like, well most of my friends miserable at their desk jobs working in sweet or law and i'm going to pursue something that i at least enjoy doing, and that was cooking. >> rose: you liked it? >> i liked it. rose: what did you like about it? >> that you could work with something and get better at it and sort of just taste and -- you're creating something, using your hands. it's something that was just the direct polar opposite of what i was doing in college or what i was being groomed to do which i had no idea. cooking was something i felt i had had an honor in. it was like a real craft. if i had more dexterity i would have been like a -- i don't know, a cooper or something like that. >> rose: or a surgeon. >> yeah, a surgeon. >> rose: (laughs) >> so you're -- you went about cooking and you got a series of jobs, including japan. >> yes. >> rose: and how influential was that? >> it was life changing. life changing. >> rose: life changing. >> yeah. i had a small stint teaching english in japan and i promised myself i'd go back to japan to do it right and to absorb the food cu
means you will be under the watch of the law forever-- forever. and we watch this extraordinary journey that jean valjean goes where this man has lost all kind of hope in humanity, and has building brutallized by the system, tries to survive and he steals some some silver from a bishop who is kind to him. and an amazingly the bisho bishop-- rather than putting him in it, says to the police oh, you know, this silver i gave it to him. and hugh's character has this extraordinary epiphany, a moment of spiritual conversion, a moment, a discovery of faith and basically commits himself to being, you know, a compassionate agent in the world and to changing the way he relates in the world. and completely reinvents himself. and we jump through time to discover this reinvention. >>ose: a who are y. >> i play, well, my character winds up being jean valjean's soul mirror. i play fontine a factory worker in his factory. at that time. he reinvented himself and event-- eventually becomes as tom said an agent for compassion. the town recognizes it and makes him the mayor. he the crow comes back in his l
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)